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Product Highlight: John Deere Replacement Parts That Won't Cost You the Farm!

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Sep 12, 2017

One of the most widely used and popular equipment brands in the agricultural industry is John Deere. John Deere sprayers include a variety of models that span from the average small farm to large-scale farms, commercial pastures or agricultural land, and field crops. All sprayers-no matter the make or model- require periodic maintenance and oftentimes this means replacing parts like sprayer tips, nozzles, or boom components. With the popularity of John Deere products, it should come as no surprise that some of our top selling replacement parts are those that are manufactured by Hypro specifically for John Deere sprayers. 

A couple of the reasons why Hypro Replacement Parts For John Deere Sprayers are so popular and frequently recommended in the industry is because they are highly effective and are also considerably less expensive than original John Deere replacement parts.  Let's take a closer look at a few best-sellers:

  • Hypro Series 9300 Hydraulic Driven Centrifugal Pump - John-Deere-Replacement-Part-Sprayer-Depot.jpgWith a hydraulic motor, the Hypro Series 9300 Pump is designed for all agricultural spray usages and can be mounted onto a Sprayer or tractor for optimal performance and efficiency. The housings are made of stainless steel or cast iron making them suitable for herbicide or pesticide applications. 
  • John Deere Replacement Spray Tip Nozzles - No matter what sort of application pattern, coverage or whether you are looking for a spray tip that will be used for pre or post-plant emergence application, we have the part that you need. Hypro-Sprayer-Depot.jpgOur selection includes  the Hypro Replacements for the John Deere Straight Stream Ceramic nozzles, Low Drift Air models, the Guardian 120° nozzles and more! 
  • John Deere Replacement Boom Components -Our John Deere Replacement Boom Components by Hypro include a wide selection of replacements for John Deere Vari-spacing boom clamps for both square tubing and round pipes, as well as single and double hose barb adapters in various sizes . 

    In addition, we also carry Hypro's line of John Deere replacement nozzle bodies, and other Hypro replacements for John Deere sprayer pump accessories. Feel free to contact us with any specific questions or go to SprayerDepot.com to check out our entire catalog of products for all your sprayer, sprayer parts, and sprayer accessories needs! 

     

Topics: Hypro, Hypro Pump, Ag Sprayers, John Deere, John Deere Replacement Parts

Product Highlight: SHURflo Pumps

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Thu, Jun 15, 2017


SHURFLO® pumps are widely used on professional spray equipment. A leading provider of fluid transfer solutions, SHURFLO® offers a variety of pumps to to fit your needs. Let's take a closer look at some of our most popular models:

SHURFLO® 8000 Series Diaphragm Pumpshurflo.jpg
  • One of the most widely used industrial pumps
  • Delivers 1.8 gpm (6.8 l/min) providing maximum performance in a wide range of spray applications
  • Designed to provide consistent, dependable performance no matter what position you mount them
  • Self-priming, and can maintain pressures up to 150 psi
  • Comes standard with an automatic demand switch and a built-in check valve
  • Like the 2088 series, these can also run dry without damage to the pump

SHURFLO® 2088 Series Diaphragm Pump

Shurflo-2088-series.jpg

 

  • Delivers reliable performance in high flow, moderate pressure applications 
  • Great for heavy duty jobs like agricultural spraying or transfer of vast amounts of fluid
  • Made with chemical-resistant materials so you can reliably pump the fluids you need to without worrying about damage to your equipment
  • Designed for lots of use and are easy to maintain
  • Can be mounted in any position

SHURFLO® SLV Series Diaphragm Pump

Shurflo-slv-diaphragm-pump.jpg

  • Offers tremendous value for low-volume spraying needs
  • Compact size makes it ideal for transportation to off-site jobs 
  • Resistant to chemicals thus preventing corrosion and breakage of essential pump parts

 

You can learn more about these SHURFLO® pumps on our website or talk to one of our customer service technicians by calling 800-228-0905. 

Shop All SHURFLO Pumps

 

 

Topics: Diaphragm pumps, Ag Sprayers, SHURflo pumps

These Replacement Parts for John Deere Sprayers Will Save You Big Money

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Fri, Jun 02, 2017

John Deere sprayers are widely used for various applications in the agricultural industry. If you need replacement parts for your John Deere spray equipment, Sprayer Depot has a variety of Hypro parts that can get your operation up and running in no time, plus save you money.

John-Deere-Sprayer.jpg

Pumps

Both hydraulic driven and gear driven Hypro replacement centrifugal pumps are available for John Deere pumps. You can use these pumps to spray a variety of substances including herbicides, insecticides and liquid fertilizers. Easily mount a versatile 9300 Series pump on your tractor to use with the hydraulic system if you want to free up your PTO. The cast iron and stainless steel housing protects the pump from the abrasive chemicals in the herbicides. Gear driven pumps are suitable for a variety of applications and with their cast iron housing, they can hold their own when used with agricultural chemicals. Gear driven Hypro replacements for John Deere pumps can tackle big spraying jobs with ease. 

Nozzle Bodies

Hypro also manufactures wet boom and dry boom nozzle bodies as replacements for John Deere nozzle bodies. Dry boom nozzle bodies are available with DVC, top mounted DVC and no DVC. They're made in three different sizes so you'll be able to select the correct one that fits your sprayer hose. For convenience, these nozzle bodies are also available in single, double or triple style. Wet boom nozzle bodies, which have a high flow rate of 7 gpm at 40 PSI will cover more ground at quicker speeds.

Spray Tips and Nozzles

You can also purchase Hypro replacements for John Deere spray tips and nozzles.  Select from various styles including low-drift, ultra low-drift, high flow, straight stream and extended range.

Boom Components

Hypro replacements for John Deere boom components and accessories include vari-spacing boom clamps, quick fitting adapters and dry boom adapters. You can choose from single or double hose adapters in various sizes.

Shop All Replacement Parts for John Deere Sprayers

 

 

Topics: Hypro, Ag Sprayers, John Deere Replacement Parts

Sprayer Depot Celebrates National Agriculture Day

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Mar 21, 2017

national-ag-day.jpg

Ag Day is a historic event that promotes recognition and appreciation for all those involved in American agriculture.

Celebrating Agriculture for 44 Years

The Agriculture Council of America (ACA) is dedicated to increasing public awareness of agriculture's vital role in our society. Comprised of leaders in the agriculture, food and fiber communities, the Agriculture Council of America along with the National Ag Day program was started in 1973.

Every spring, producers along with agricultural associations, companies, universities, government agencies and others across the country join together in recognition—and appreciation—of agriculture in our country.

Farming and Beyond

The need for food produced in the United States is dramatic. Each American farmer feeds more than 144 people.* Agriculture is this nation's #1 export and is essential in sustaining a healthy economy.

And it's not just the farmer who makes our food possible. The entire agriculture industry, all the way to the grocery store, are vital links in a chain that brings food to every citizen - and millions of people abroad. That's really what this day is all about . . . recognizing the role of agriculture - and celebrating it.

The National Ag Day program encourages every American to:

  • Understand how food and fiber products are produced

  • Appreciate the role agriculture plays in providing safe, abundant and affordable products

  • Value the essential role of agriculture in maintaining a strong economy

  • Acknowledge and consider career opportunities in the agriculture, food and fiber industry

At Sprayer Depot, we offer a full line of spray equipment and sprayer partsKings-Skid-Sprayer.jpg for the small and mid-sized ag markets, including skid-mounted sprayers, motorized mist blower backpack sprayers, hydraulic sprayers, spray tips and more.

For more information on National Ag Day, visit www.agday.org.

 

Shop All Kings Sprayers

* Agriculture Council of America (ACA) 

Topics: Skid Sprayers, Ag Sprayers, National Ag day

8 Easy Steps to Calibrating Your Sprayer

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Fri, Dec 04, 2015

Calibrating your sprayer doesn't have to be time consuming or challenging. You have probably seen all the formulas and calculations involved with the process but there is an easy way to accomplish this task without having to be a math wiz.

It is important to calibrate your sprayer at least once every season, however more is definitely better. Calibrating your sprayer often will ensure an even application rate and also an effective one. This will save you time and money that you can then invest in other parts of your business. 

As mentioned before, there are many reasons why you should calibrate your spray equipment on a regular basis, but an extremely important reason to consider is to avoid any mishandling of pesticides and other chemicals. When using chemicals it's important to follow the instructions provided on the label: too little could mean an ineffective application, and too much could result in serious consequences such as the loss of your grass or crop, fines, or even health risks.

Based on a recent report by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), farmers spend approximately $4.1 billion on pesticides annually. So if your sprayer isn't calibrated properly you could potentially be wasting a lot of money. Let's make sure you are spending your money wisely and spraying efficiently by calibrating your sprayer.

Want to know how you can avoid any mishaps and increase the accuracy of your application? Read below for the 8 simple steps to calibrating your sprayer.

Before you follow the steps, get your sprayer ready for calibration by following these tips:

  • Inspect your sprayer for any mechanical problems
  • Flush the tank and brush the nozzles to make sure they are debris free
  • Check the agitator in the tank to make sure it’s working properly

Okay, now you are ready to calibrate!

 steps-to-calibrating-your-sprayer.jpg

*For minor changes in output, adjust your sprayer pressure to achieve the GPA recommended by the pesticide label. For major changes, either change travel speed or nozzle tip size and recalibrate.

Have questions? Contact us today!

Click Here to Talk to a Customer Service  Technician

 

Topics: Sprayer Depot, calibrating a sprayer, Sprayer Calibration, Ag Sprayers, Chemical Sprayers, Boom Sprayer Calibration, How to Calibrate a Boom Sprayer, user guide, infographics, calibrating app

2015 Sprayer Related Industry Trends

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Jan 07, 2015

designed by Freepik.comAs we close the books on 2014, let’s take a look at what’s in store for sprayer-related industries in 2015. The US economy continues to rebound and so do many of the sprayer-related industries we’ll cover here. Using industry reports and news as a source, we’ve provided a top-line view of the 2015 outlook for the lawn and landscape, pest control, golf and recreation, agriculture, and horticulture industries.

Lawn & Landscape 2015 Outlook

As the industry rebounds, reports here and here show that the improving housing market, commercial construction and property occupancy rates are among positive factors that boosted the industry last year and project an even stronger 2015. Not only are landscape companies anticipating increases in installation and maintenance, but equipment dealers are also seeing solid gains. 

Pest Control 2015 Outlook

IBIS World, a market research company, reports that the pest control industry is in the growth phase of its life cycle citing rising demand for industry services due to increased number of pests and use of extermination services. It’s interesting to note that Forbes.com recently reported on a Sageworks study that lists Services to Building and Dwellings, including pest control, as a top five industry to start a business.

Golf & Recreation 2015 Outlook

Mike Zawacki, editor of the Golf Course Industry magazine, said it best in that “we’re constantly discussing the state of the industry … as we see it.” His recap shares that being good stewards of existing resources, such as water, will continue to be a focus for the industry as we all seek to create a more sustainable and environmentally responsible golf course. This is a theme not just for golf, but also for many industries in this post.

Agriculture 2015 Outlook

The Agriculture industry outlook is up and down. According to recent reports from BusinessWeek and Farm Equipment, farm machinery sales are projected to continue to slump in 2015 as a result of falling crop prices, though other factors also appear to be contributing to an overall slowdown. To that end, the Des Moines Register reported the Department of Agriculture said farmers predicted plantings of the eight major field crops – corn soybeans, wheat, cotton, sorghum, barley, oats and rice – will amount to 3.8 million acres less than 2014 calculations. It’s not all bad though; long-term industry outlooks remain unchanged from current levels and show slow, steady gains.

Horticulture 2015 Outlook

In the Horticulture Industry, the Garden Media Group 2015 Garden Trends Report shows an interesting consumer focus towards products that are environmentally friendly and safe. While there’s still debate according to Horticulture Week about the flower of the year, one thing these reports all shed light on is a focus for consumers to spend more time outdoors. That great news extends to lawn and landscape industry vendors as well.

Of course, what these reports convey can only be taken with a grain of salt as each business and region within a given sector may experience varied results than the industry projection. To that end, no one can truly project what’s in store. For the most part, the overall economy continues to rebound creating a trickle effect that bolsters each industry outlook as well.

Here’s to getting into the habit of writing 2015 on everything.

Happy Spraying!

 

Image Source: designed by Freepik

Topics: Sprayer Depot, sprayers, landscaper, pest control, golf course maintenance, golf course sprayers, lawn sprayers, Ag Sprayers, sprayer tips and tricks, horticulture, industry outlook

Choose the Right Roller Pump

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Nov 12, 2014

Hypro roller pumpChoosing the right roller pump for your sprayer and application needs can be tricky. After all, the pump is the heart of the sprayer and roller pumps are the top all-around choice for agriculture and industrial spraying. This includes turf spraying of herbicides and pesticides, liquid fertilizers and many other liquids. These spray pumps have a low initial cost and are pretty versatile too. Still, there’s no one solution that meets everyone’s needs making the search for the best solution at times mystifying.

Before we get into the nitty gritty, it’s important to note the basics. A roller pump has 4 to 8 rollers depending on the model, that revolve inside the pump housing to force the spray solution out to the nozzle. These pumps operate at PTO speeds of 540 and 1000 rpm – a definite point to note for choosing the right pump. Roller pumps have a pressure range up to 300 psi and flow rates up to 74 gpm. These products are self-priming and easily adapt to PTO or gas engine drives. These pumps require no check valves while providing positive displacement characteristics. Got it? Good. Now let’s get into choosing the right roller pump.

Consider this real-life scenario that one of our customers shared with us:

“I bought a used 55 gallon tank sprayer with wand and boom for spraying weeds and fire control. It had a 4 roller pump on it that quit/froze a year and a half ago. I replaced with another 4 roller pump and this spring it froze again. The sprayer has a 3hp Briggs motor with a 5/8'' shaft. I would like to know if I can use a larger pump and/or what you would suggest.”

Know the answer? If not, take a look at the steps below for easy identification of the roller pump that will meet your needs. Or skip ahead and check out the solution for this particular scenario.

3 Steps for Pump Selection:

1.) Determine your highest spraying pressure (psi).

For spray guns, 40 psi is often typical at the nozzle, but to properly select a pump that can deliver the right spray pressure, you should calculate it yourself. Keep in mind that pressure losses are normal and should be factored into the equation. It’s recommended that you add 120 psi for system pressure losses.

Desired Pressure at Nozzle (psi)
+ Hose Pressure Loss (psi)
Total Pump Pressure Needed (psi)

2.) Calculate the total pump flow (gpm) using the formula below.

Now you’ll need to know the boom flow and agitation for that calculation. You can determine your boom flow (gpm) by multiplying the gpm per nozzle by the number of nozzles. The flow required for agitation is a little easier as that is determined by tank size. For a 500-gallon tank you’re looking at 25gpm, 750-gallon tank will be 37 gpm, 1,000-gallon tank at 50 gpm and 1,500-gallon tank at 75 gpm.  

Boom Flow (gpm)  
+ Agitation (gpm)
Total Pump Flow (gpm)

3.) Choose the pump based on the manufacturer’s catalog performance charts.

Sounds simple, but in addition to the numbers you just crunched you’ll also want to keep chemical compatibility in mind. Specific seal, roller and casting materials can be selected for compatibility with certain herbicides, pesticides, fungicides and fertilizers. The three housing material options – Cast Iron such as the Delavan line, Ni-Resist or Silver (for these purposes we’ll be referring to Hypro’s Silver Series XL roller pumps) – are particularly important for total pump life. Studies have shown, especially with weed control chemicals such as Roundup that the Silver Series XL line is more durable and affords a 10x longer pump life.

Now back to our example. This customer had a standard gas engine without gear reduction. In that case, the best solution was to replace the pump with another 4 roller pump (product 4101C) and keep an eye on maintenance for better long-term wear. Another solution would have been to use a different model, but that would have resulted in purchasing a gear reduced engine. In the long run, this customer was better off just replacing the pump with the same model.

Have anything to add or a dilemma our technical gurus can assist with? Share in the comments below or contact us today.

Topics: Hypro, herbicides, Sprayer Depot, Customer Spotlight, Roller Pump, roller pumps, Hypro Pump, Hypro Roller Pump, Ag Sprayers, insecticide, boom, spray gun, delavan cast iron

National Farm Safety and Health Week Sprayer Safety Tips

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Sep 30, 2014

National Farm Safety The team here at Sprayer Depot is joining the nation in observance of National Farm Safety and Health Week (September 21-27, 2014) by sharing some essential tips for sprayer safety. According to Allan Vyhnalek, UNL extension educator, in The Banner-Press, “Farming ranks behind mining with the second highest number of disabling and fatal incidents annually.” So we’re joining the campaign to help bring awareness and share safety tips that can help curb this statistic. 

For our friends in rural areas especially, the use of a slow moving sign is a great first step. That’s the reflective orange triangle that’s meant to alert motorists to a – you guessed it – slow moving vehicle. According to the National Ag Safety Database, all vehicles that can’t keep up a speed of more than 40 km/h (25 mph), for example, road construction equipment, must display the slow moving vehicle sign on the rear of the vehicle.

As for the sprayer itself, here’s a little pop quiz for you:

Sprayer calibration includes which of the following?
a) checking strainers   b) checking lines   c) checking pumps   d) all of the above

Too easy? If you guessed (d) all of the above, you’re correct. Of course, there’s a lot more to sprayer calibration that we’ve covered in previous posts. So let’s stick to three pillars of sprayer safety – filling the sprayer, using the sprayer and cleaning the sprayer.

Filling the sprayer

If you’re using water to fill the sprayer tank, consider the following:

  • Make sure that the end of the filling hose is positioned 4” or more above the sprayer’s filling hole.
  • Don’t leave the sprayer unattended while you fill it up. This will help avoid overflow or other spillage.

When filling the sprayer tank with a chemical based substance, use these precautions:

  • Avoid using the same spot every time you handle concentrated chemicals when filling the sprayer tank. That way, if there are minor spills you’ll benefit from an active soil breakdown. You also won’t have to worry about issues from transporting a full tank of solution through environmentally protected areas.
  • A shovel and plastic bag can be used to pick up any spillage on the ground.

Using the sprayer / protect the environment and yourself

  • Consider decorating the front of your rig with a wind streamer that will help show you which way the wind is blowing and its likely force.
  • Plan ahead for wind changes and, as always, keep an eye on the weather forecast.
  • Never attempt any repairs with liquid in the spray tank.
  • Avoid over-spraying. It can put your crops at risk, and it poses a hazard. Plus it’s just wasteful.

Cleaning the sprayer inside and out

Of course, we recommend following the manufacturer’s recommendation for cleaning your sprayer inside and out, but here are some general guidelines that can help as well. Cleaning should happen on a daily basis. If you’ve calibrated your sprayer correctly, chances are there is very little remaining in the tank after you finish spraying, which is all the better.

  • Dilute the leftover liquid and then spray it over an area that complies with approved use and in a manner that avoids exceeding max dosage. Diluted 10x with water and sprayed over a just treated area often meets requirements.
  • If you have a dedicated rinsing tank mounted on your rig, it makes the process quick and easy for cleaning in the field.
  • For many of our readers who don’t have a dedicated tank, flush the inside of the tank with an equivalent amount of 10% of the tank size. Repeat twice making sure that all the valves are activated.
  • Take care to ensure to follow local rules for disposal, which often means avoiding ditches, drains and sewage.
  • Use a high pressure hose to rinse the exterior of the rig, paying attention to those areas that get more contamination like the back of the rig/tank, wheels and boom, if applicable.

If you have time, the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety is offering a weeklong webinar series on a variety of health and safety concerns that serve as a great reminder. After all we can’t be too careful.

Topics: Sprayer Depot, sprayers, sprayer performance, Ag Sprayers, sprayer tips and tricks, cleaning sprayer, sprayer safety, national farm safety and health week, filling the sprayer, using a sprayer

Water Use Peaks in July: 5 Tips to Smart Spraying

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Jul 08, 2014

July is Smart Irrigation MonthWhether you manage a farm, run Public Works or maintain a golf course, managing and conserving resources to improve water availability is key. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, of the 26 billion gallons of water consumed daily in the United States, approximately 7.8 billion gallons (30%), is devoted to outdoor expenditures with the majority used for irrigation. As you might have assumed, the amount of water used outdoors
peaks during the summer, particularly during the month of July.

Kings Sprayers Skid Sprayer with Manual Hose Reel

We all need to do our part to conserve and given that it is Smart Irrigation Month, an initiative dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation empowering professionals with knowledge to help save water, we at Sprayer Depot thought it was only fitting to provide a refresher with a few strategies to help you do your part to conserve this natural resource. Here’s to spraying smarter.

Off the top of your head, you might be thinking of water conservation tips like determining the amount and timing of irrigation for efficient water use. You’re right on track. Another tactic to consider is monitoring water application for crop needs and soil moisture content. Take a look at the five tips below to ensure you spray smarter during Smart Irrigation Month: 

  • Consider soil type. Type of soil determines how quickly water can be absorbed without runoff. Watering more than soil can absorb causes runoff and waste. Light sandy soils hold less water than heavy clay soils.
  • Water only when needed. Saturate root zones and let the soil dry. Watering too much and too frequently results in shallow roots, weed growth, disease and fungus. Learn your crop’s water requirements by determining how much water the crop has used, then on the next irrigation only water long enough to replace that amount of moisture.
  • Water at the best time. Watering during the heat of the day may cause losses of up to 30 percent due to evaporation. Prevent water loss by watering when the sun is low or down, winds are calm and temperatures are cool – typically between the evening and early morning.
  • Water more often for shorter periods. For example, watering for three, 5-minute intervals let soil absorb more water than watering for 15 minutes at one time, reducing runoff.
  • Adapt watering to the season. Adjust the watering schedule regularly based on seasonal weather conditions. These vary by state and region. For example, many utilities rely on stored water from winter snowpack that gradually releases water from the melting snow during spring and summer. And the monsoon season in the Southwestern United States causes flash flooding during the summer season, effecting crops and landscapes alike.

In addition to these strategies to conserve water, you should also inspect your sprayer equipment to ensure it is in proper working order, free of leaks. Read our recent post on sprayer pump repair kits and routine maintenance if you haven’t already conducted your seasonal sprayer inspection.

Smart Irrigation Month is an initiative of the Irrigation Association, a non-profit industry organization dedicated to promoting efficient irrigation.

Topics: Sprayer Depot, custom build sprayer, lawn sprayer, public works, sprayers, sprayer, landscaper, golf course maintenance, golf course sprayers, Athletic Field Sprayers, spray tips, Ag Sprayers, Golf course equipment, fairway sprayer, sprayer checklist, smart irrigation, sprayer equipment, water conservation tips, Smart Irrigation Month, conservation, spray smarter

Still time for sprayer calibration

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Mon, Jun 09, 2014

Reprinted from OhioAg.net

 

With planting delays in some areas due to wet conditions, growers still have time to fine-tune and calibrate their sprayers to save money and protect the environment, according to an engineer from Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.

Sprayers can make a big difference for growers’ pocketbooks and the environment, said Erdal Ozkan, an agricultural engineering professor and spray technology expert with Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center (OARDC).

Kings 4 Wheel Sprayer

OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the college.

“With the high cost of pesticides and fertilizers, growers who want to save money and spray chemicals as efficiently as possible need to make sure they fine-tune and calibrate their sprayers to work as accurately as possible, and get the job done with less use of chemical inputs,” Ozkan said.

The costs of those wasted chemicals can be high.

Farmers spend approximately $4.1 billion on pesticides annually, according to published reports. National surveys of field application results have shown that only about one out of three sprayers are applying pesticides at the recommended rates, while two-thirds are missing the mark by either over- or underspraying, Ozkan said.

“In Ohio and other states, if we use an error margin of plus or minus 5 percent as the yard stick, nearly 50 percent of growers fail to get to that error margin,” he said. “If the intended rate and actual rate is different than that, then growers need to recalibrate their sprayer.”

Of the 50 percent of growers who fail to obtain the 5 percent margin error, nearly half of them are over-applying their chemicals at an average rate of 23 percent, Ozkan said.

“For example, if a grower has a $10,000 budget for chemical pesticides, and they happen to be in the group over-applying by 23 percent, that means they are throwing away at least $2,300 alone in that error,” he said. “And if they aren’t applying the right amount of chemicals, which could result in a larger economic impact because the chemicals may not work, the grower may have to reapply and their crops could suffer from yield loss.”

Tips for fine-tuning sprayers include:

  • Double-check your sprayer for mechanical problems before you start using it. You won’t have time to do this when planting is in full swing.

  • Clean the sprayer tank thoroughly, and make sure nozzle filters are clean.

  • Clean spray nozzles, check their flow rates, and replace the ones that are spraying more than 10 percent of the original output.

  • Check the agitator in the tank to make sure it’s working properly.

  • Run water through the spray system to make sure everything is working properly.

  • Find out if the sprayer is delivering the proper application rate (gallons per acre).

While there are multiple ways to calibrate a sprayer, Ozkan said, growers should always measure the travel speed, measure the flow rate of the nozzle to ensure correct operating pressure, and check the system’s pressure gauge.

The following is typically the easiest way to calibrate for broadcast application that doesn’t require complicated calculations, he said:

1. Fill the sprayer tank with water.

2. Run the sprayer, inspect it for leaks, and make sure all vital parts function properly.

3. Measure the distance in inches between the nozzles. Then measure an appropriate distance in the field based on this nozzle spacing.

4. Drive through the measured distance in the field at your normal spraying speed and record the travel time in seconds. Repeat this procedure and average the two measurements.

5. With the sprayer parked, run the sprayer at the same pressure level and catch the output from each nozzle in a measuring jar for the travel time required in Step 4.

6. Calculate the average nozzle output by adding the individual outputs and then dividing by the number of nozzles tested. If an individual sample collected is more than 10 percent higher or lower than the average nozzle output rate, check for clogs and clean the tip, or replace the nozzle.

7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 until the variation in discharge rate for all nozzles is within 10 percent of the average.

8. Then, the final average output in ounces is equal to the application rate in gallons per acre: Average output (ounces) = Application rate (GPA).

9. Compare the actual application rate with the recommended or intended rate. If the actual rate is more than 5 percent higher or lower than the recommended or intended rate, you must make adjustments.

10. You can start the adjustments by changing the pressure. Lowering the spray pressure will reduce the spray delivered; higher pressure means more spray is delivered. Don’t vary from the pressure range recommended for the nozzles that you use.

11. You also can correct the application error by changing the actual travel speed. Slower speeds mean more spray is delivered; faster speeds mean less spray is delivered.

12. If these changes don’t bring the application rate to the desired rate, then you may have to select a new set of nozzles with smaller or larger orifices.

13. Recalibrate the sprayer (repeat steps 5 through 12) after any adjustment.

For more information on sprayer calibration, see ohioline.osu.edu/aex-fact/0520.html.

 

Topics: Sprayer Depot, Sprayer Calibration, Ag Sprayers, Chemical Sprayers

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