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Sprayer Depot Blog

5 Ways to Use a 2-Wheel Trailer Sprayer in Lawn Care

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Mar 31, 2015

KingsSprayersUsed for a variety of purposes throughout the lawn and landscape industry, our 2-wheel trailer sprayers by Kings Sprayers are very versatile and allow users to cover large areas that they might not otherwise be able to tackle with just a hose. Great for lawns, pastures, golf courses and athletic fields, here we’ll explore five ways to use a 2-wheel sprayer that you may not have considered. Have other ideas? Share them in the comments below. We’d love to hear your thoughts. 

1.) Snow Removal

Our friends up north could use the 2-wheel trailer sprayer for snow removal in the winter months, as this model doubles as a de-icing/anti-icing sprayer. After all, not all de-icing jobs are highways. Keep areas like driveways, sidewalks and parking lots safe and free of ice. Just add a de-icing solution to the tank and go to town clearing a path with 12’ booms in action. Use the boomless nozzle to spray frozen tires on your vehicle too. It’s a great tool to increase safety and access in the winter.

2.) Watering

An obvious choice, the 2-wheel trailer sprayer is a great resource for watering. With this product on hand, all you have to do is fill up the tank and be on your way watering large areas with the 12’ boom option. We’ve even seen some customers who tow the 2-wheel sprayer behind a mower, allowing them to multitask by watering at the same time as they cut the grass. Talk about efficient. Using the spray gun option you can easily spray trees and have a tank full of water at the ready for multiple stops.

3.) Fertilizing

Using the 2-wheel trailer sprayer to fertilize commercial, residential and recreational areas is a practical alternative to walk-behind rotary fertilizers. It’s also a time-saving option and has shown that this type of application results in applying product more consistently for the job since employees become less fatigued than they might otherwise with the push options. On top of that, using a liquid fertilizer reduces potential runoff and allows for more chemical control.

4.) Herbicides

These sprayers are a great option for herbicide application, or weed control, by allowing you to spray a pre-emergent herbicide to an entire lawn using the boom, as just one example. After all, there are a variety of herbicides used to combat a variety of weeds, in order to achieve a healthy lawn.

5.) Insecticides

Pest control is a popular use for the 2-wheel trailer sprayer within the lawn and landscape segment as outdoor spaces are often threatened by a multitude of pests. With a two-wheel sprayer, folks can easily apply an insecticide across an entire lawn or planter area using the 12’ boom or boomless nozzle.

There are a variety of other uses for the 2-wheel trailer sprayer that delivers high pressure to spray trees or shrubs, high-volume for turf spraying, high flotation turf tires roll easily, and it’s wide stance keep the sprayer stable on most terrains.

To learn more about the Kings Sprayers line and determine a model that’s right for you, contact our Customer Service Technicians.

Topics: herbicides, fertilizer sprayer, Sprayer Depot, Kings Sprayers, pest control, Kings 2 Wheel Sprayer, Pesticide Applicators, pesticides, sprayer tips and tricks, fertilizer, insecticide, de-icing sprayer, snow removal

How To Manage Spray Drift in 5 Easy Steps

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Aug 27, 2014

Kings SprayerImagine you’re applying pesticides using a backpack sprayer. Or, just the same, you’re spraying from a truck using a tank, pump and hose to apply chemicals. Maybe you’re using a boom setup. For that matter, you could even be piloting an airplane and in each situation the definition of spray drift is the same.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency: “pesticide drift is the movement of pesticide dust or droplets through the air at the time of application or soon after, to any site other than the area intended.”

We’re all aware of those two dreaded words: Spray Drift. While the repercussions of it vary for each industry and application type, the definition and solutions to manage spray drift are similar. In many of these scenarios above the issue with spray drift can lead to spotty pest control, wasted chemicals, off-target damage, water and air quality issues and higher costs. That last one really hurts. As the public becomes more aware of pesticide concerns, and regulators are quick to slap fines, spray drift management from that standpoint is vital to our livelihood.

Much like you take precautions to protect yourself with your work attire by making sure to wear proper clothing, eye protection and closed-toe shoes, you should also consider these five steps to manage spray drift from Sprayer Depot.

  1. Avoid spraying when weather conditions are unfavorable. I know, I know. You’ve heard this time and time again that weather affects spray drift. It’s true though and often times we get so caught up in our day-to-day that we ignore this important factor. Think about the day’s conditions as it relates to wind, temperature and humidity, air stability, etc. Know your product labels well and understand these requirements, even for wind velocity. Make adjustments accordingly. It may, even on the extreme end, require you to reschedule that day’s work. Also think about how droplet size factors into the weather issue. Large droplets are less likely to drift in general because they fall more quickly, evaporate more slowly and are less affected by the wind given their size. We like that.
  2. Consider using buffer zones. This aspect is becoming more important given label requirements these days. These "no spray zones" serve as a barrier to protect sensitive areas and vary greatly for each landscape, equipment and application type. Design of a buffer area depends on variables like spray method, wind, chemical type and the type of sensitive area that you’re trying to avoid. In general there is not a one-size-fits-all rule.
  3. Try new technologies like drift reduction nozzles. We recently spoke to Mark Techler with Hypro & SHURflo Ag and Industrial Pumps and Accessories in a recent blog post about drift control spray tips. He explained that these drift control spray tips “use air induction to produce air filled droplets, which dramatically reduce drift compared to conventional tips.” He went on to share the benefits of this new tech and offered up the Hypro SprayIT Calculator as a resource the next time your considering one of these new parts.
  4. Lower spray (boom) heights. It makes sense. The higher the boom, and thus the spray nozzle, are above the target, the more likely that wind will move droplets away from the intended area. Your nozzle label will offer a recommendation on nozzle height, which can serve as a good starting point to adjust the boom height. However, often those recommendations for nozzle height are much higher than optimum on large application equipment traveling at higher speeds. Of course, you want to ensure the boom isn’t too low, which can create uneven patterns. A 1:1 boom height has generally been the standard, but some recommend getting a tad closer so we recommend using the manufacturer recommendation as a starting point and working down from there – take into account your unique landscape and spray mechanics. 
  5. Use lower pressures.  In general, the concept that we’ve all heard is to use lower pressures, which result in larger droplets. However, in today’s application world this method might need some adjusting given the new technologies with drift control spray nozzles. With the design of some drift control spray nozzles that introduce air induction, these tips will create a drop in pressure while still producing larger droplets. 

Your actions can affect spray drift. After all, you CAN control the equipment you use and the field conditions you spray. So while you may not have control over the weather or even the neighboring property, you can be empowered by these 5 easy steps to manage spray drift and you have the opportunity to educate your team, too.

Topics: Spray Equipment Maintenance, Hypro, Boom Sprayer, fertilizer sprayer, Sprayer Depot, sprayers, spray equipment checklist, sprayer, spray tips, calibrating a sprayer, spray tip, spray tip selection, Shurflo, Sprayer Calibration, sprayer checklist, sprayer equipment, sprayer nozzle, spray drift, spray tip calculator, spray tip selector, drift control spray tip, drift control, Sprayer Set Up, Calibrating a Boom Sprayer, Boom Sprayer Calibration, sprayer tips and tricks

Customer Spotlight: Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT)

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Jul 22, 2014

UDOTThe Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) has the responsibility to plan, construct and maintain the state highway system. The state reported 45,881 total public road mileage, including state, county, city, forest service, national park service, native American and other roadways. That’s a lot of surfaces for the 13th largest state by size in the United States. To keep those roadways in tip top shape, UDOT uses a variety of equipment including, as you may have assumed, sprayers.

So we asked the Urban Area Supervisor for his insight on how sprayers are use in his line of work.

1. What type of spray equipment does the UDOT use?
We have several types of equipment that are used here from 250-350 gallon tanks in urban areas and up to 2,000 gallon tanks in rural areas. Smaller tanks are operated from our maintenance one-ton trucks with the large tanks mounted in our ten-wheeler trucks. We also use an ATV mounted sprayer with a small tank to get the areas that are not accessible by trucks. Plus, we have hose reels, side bar sprayers, and boom buster sprayers that spray up to 35'.

UDOT using an ATV mounted sprayer     UDOT using a spray gun extension

2. What is typically being sprayed?
We are using pesticides and herbicides for weed control and vegetative management. We are targeting our areas that have noxious weeds like Kochia, Thistles, White Top and nuisance weeds.

3. Who is in charge of maintaining the spray equipment?
Our station maintenance personnel who hold an applicators license take care of the equipment that they are using. If it is a major repair, then we have our region maintenance shop fix the problem.

4. What months of the year do you use spray equipment?
We start using our equipment in March and will spray into June. Then we have areas that spray in September and October.

5. What are the general responsibilities of the DOT?
Our general responsibilities are preserving infrastructure, maintaining our roadways, and keeping roads and interstates clean and safe for our traveling public. Doing all we can to help with zero fatalities.

6. Are there custom-sprayers in your fleet?
Yes, we have built custom over the years.

7. How often is the spray equipment used? (Daily? Weekly?)
It’s used weekly in our peak seasons. We have also used these sprayers for maintenance operations where water is need to help the activity.

8. Do you typically place orders for sprayer parts and accessories on the website? Or is the order phoned in?
Prefer to phone the order in.

Topics: Spray Equipment Maintenance, Maintenance, Hoses, Reels, Custom-built Skid Sprayer, Hose Reel, Hose Reels, Custom-built sprayer, Custom-build a sprayer, ATV sprayer, spray equipment, herbicides, Boom Sprayer, fertilizer sprayer, Spray Guns, Sprayer Depot, custom built sprayers, custom build sprayer, lawn sprayer, public works, UDOT, Customer Spotlight, Utah Department of Transportation, Department of Transportation, DOT, Customer

What it Takes to Keep a Golf Course in Tip-Top Condition

Posted by Marketing Manager on Thu, Jan 30, 2014

Contributed by Guest Blogger:  Wes Eavey, Golf Course Superintendent
Falcon's Fire Golf Club, Kissimmee, FL 
 
 
Sprayer Depot 

Most Golf Course Maintenance Operations start at 5 a.m. I compare prepping the golf course for play each day to  a race. The pace of the race depends on what type of course you are... public, resort or private. Generally the pace is much slower and detail orientated in a private golf club setting. In Florida, the growing season is 365 days a year so many clubs mow the greens every day. Mowing heights on greens can range anywhere from .09" to .150". You can skip a day or two during cold weather, but most operations opt to roll greens in place of mowing. Generally Tees, Fairways, Approaches and Collars are mowed 2-3 days a week, depending  on growth and time of year. Heights on these areas are in the .250" to .650 range.

Private clubs will generally walk-mow greens, tees and collars and lower budget courses will use riding mowers. Rough is generally mowed once per week over several days. Heights in rough can be anywhere from 1.25" with Bermuda grass to 3-4" with Bluegrass and Rye. The highest maintenance area on any course is those holes in the ground filled with sand called Bunkers. Bunkers are raked every day to every other day on most courses. Lastly, but arguably the most important is the service man or woman. This person sets up the course daily for play. This includes moving tee markers, filling divots, moving traffic controls and cutting a new hole on the green every day.

The job of the Superintendent and Assistant Superintendent is much like a conductor of an Orchestra. We make sure people are where they are supposed to be and doing their assigned task. When everything is moving correctly, it is a beautiful thing to watch! We have done our job when we have properly prepared the course without getting caught by the early sunrise golfer. Other daily jobs of the Superintendent, Assistant, Spray Tech or Irrigation Tech include a weekly foliar fertilizer application to greens.  Some high end courses will also spray tee tops at the same frequency. Fairways are generally sprayed every 3-4 weeks with a foliar fertilizer or plant growth regulator to slow growth and reduce mow applications. Weeds are spot sprayed, every surface of the course is roamed over in search of plant disease. Irrigation is run to water hot spots and the system is constantly looked over for irrigation failure. Long range applications include 3-4 wall to wall pre-emerge applications for weed control, 1-2 applications per year for insect control (in Florida the dreaded Mole Cricket) and several bulk wall to wall granular fertilizer applications to keep the grass green & growing.

Aerification. Every golfer I've ever met hates to hear about Aerification. I always hear, " Why are you aerating the greens, they are perfect!"  But, it is an absolute necessity if you wish to maintain healthy turf grass. Golf Courses usually aerate greens 2-3 times year in the growing season. As grass grows it produces thatch, with is made up dead and decaying grass. Over time this will build up and produce an organic layer not conducive to plant growth. The objective is to remove as much of this layer as possible. In the golf course industry that annual displacement number is 25%. If you can remove 25% of your playing surface through cultivation per year, than you have a good chance to stay ahead of the curve. Unfortunately, this displacement is rarely met and greens will accumulate organic matter, worsen every year and turf grass quality will decline with age.

 
 

Topics: fertilizer sprayer, golf course sprayers, Golf course equipment, spot sprayers, fairway sprayer

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