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Sprayer Depot Blog

3 Reasons Why a Strainer Is an Important Part of Your Sprayer

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Dec 16, 2015

Recently, our Customer Service Technicians have fielded a few calls regarding clogged strainers. While it may seem like a basic sprayer maintenance issue, it's often overlooked by even large companies with fleets of trucks and multiple sprayer units. 

So, we've updated this helpful post to emphasize the importance of good spray equipment maintenance.

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Clogging can cause a number of expensive problems on your sprayer. The fix to this common issue is Clogged_Strainer-filter.jpgsimple and economical: properly install and service your strainer. The strainer in your sprayer is one of the easiest parts to maintain, however it's probably the most overlooked one. A clean and properly sealed strainer will allow proper flow to the pump and contribute to a longer pump life. For most applications, a standard Buna Gasket is adequate. However, if you find that you are replacing the Buna Gasket frequently, a Viton Gasket is a more durable option. 

Why is such a small part on your unit so important? There are three main reasons:

 

  1. Maintains consistent fluid circulation throughout the pump

  2. Keeps nozzles from clogging 

  3. Helps achieve optimal sprayer operation

Prevent Clogs
 
Some of the main reasons why a strainer gets clogged include: (1) incorrect mesh size; (2) lack of maintenance; and (3) insufficient consideration for the liquid that getting sprayed (fertilizers require a larger mesh strainer than water based chemicals). When shopping for strainers, pay close attention to the mesh size. It generally ranges from 10-200 and the higher the number the tighter the mesh. On most agricultural and pest control sprayers the recommended mesh size is 16-30. We manufacture all of our Kings Sprayers with a 20 size mesh screen. However, depending on your application and the type of liquid being sprayed you may need a different size. If you need a recommendation just let one of our Customer Service Technicians know and they will fit your sprayer with the appropriate mesh. 
 
Cleaning the strainer should be done after every use. We get it, after a hard day's work you are ready to put the sprayer away and head home. But taking 5 minutes to flush it out will pay off in the future. We've seen it before, many customers have brought their sprayers to our service department for a repairafter they've spent hundreds of dollars replacing every other part in an attempt to figure out why there's a loss of pressure. The first thing we typically check is the strainer, and we often find it clogged like the one pictured above. 
 
Clean Your Strainer
 
No need to remove the strainer from the line in order to clean it. Simply unscrew the bowl from the cap and take out the screen. Next, flush any debris and sediment from the screen. Finish up by reassembling the strainer by first fitting the screen to the flange in the bowl. Hand tightening the bowl provides a sufficient seal.
 
Popular Strainers

Strainers come in all types of materials, from nylon to poly, and even aluminum. Their shapes also vary, with "T" strainers being the most popular styles and "Y" strainers coming in a close second. Some of our best sellers include:

3350 0056 actual resized 600Clear T strainerBanjoYStrainer actual resized 600

Get more tips on how to make your equipment last longer!

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Topics: Hypro, Maintenance, strainer, sprayer strainer, strainer for spray equipment, hypro line strainer, clear blow t strainer, spray tips, filter, screen, sprayer tips and tricks, Banjo, Spray maintenance, poly, mesh, nylon strainer

5 Tips for Seasonal Sprayer Maintenance

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Mon, Sep 22, 2014

Kings Sprayers

As the season changes to autumn (officially on Sept. 22, 2014), the scenery for many of us quickly follows, adding to it shades of red, orange and yellow to the typically green landscape. The weather too will turn cooler (at least we’re hopeful in Florida) and of course the needs of our sprayer changes too. While we’re not quite to the point where we need to winterize our tools, care should be given to prep for that necessary activity and to ensure the changing weather elements don’t impact the end of your season. We’ve combed over our collection of trade tips to uncover the essential needs for this time of year.

Below are five tips for autumn sprayer maintenance from Sprayer Depot to keep you going through the end of the season. 

1. Flush your sprayer.

To get rid of all excess chemical and chemical residues, flush your sprayer at least twice with clean water. It would be awful to not flush your pump with a month left in the spray season and then rupture some diaphragms. That would result in late season repairs you might not have accounted for, let alone the hassle. When you’re finished, make sure there’s no debris left in the tank.

2. Clean strainers.

This is one of those tasks no one enjoys, but is so necessary. Partially clogged strainers can result in drops in pressure and even reduce the flow rate of your nozzle. Not to mention that a clogged or dirty strainer can be a source of contamination where you may least expect it. Since most sprayers have more than one strainer, take care to clean each.

3.  Check fuel levels.

Make sure the oil levels in your spray pump, gearbox and engine are at appropriate levels. If you do need to refill oil, check with the part manufacturer to ensure you’re using the recommended oil.

4.  Inspect machine.

What you’re looking for are a number of things, including: worn nozzles; damaged nozzle screens and strainers; cracks, leaks and overall performance in the pump; hose condition, especially cracks or brittleness; any possible leaky valves or areas where valve seals may have loosened; and finally your booms (if applicable) to make sure there aren’t any cracks that need to be fixed. While you’re at it, keep the equipment clean by wiping down motors, pumps and lines.

5. Get a winterization game plan.

As the weather changes, winter is fast approaching and it’s time to dig out your winter coat. This is also the time to think about scheduling your annual winterization maintenance and end of year sprayer tune-up. Remember that caring for your machine properly now will pay off next year when it’s time to break it back out and use it. Put it in your calendar today and check back for more tips on winterizing your sprayer as the date approaches.

With sprayer season coming to a close in most parts of the country, our friends in the lawn maintenance and pesticide industries are busy making one more pass at killing weeds before the season ends. With so many holidays approaching it can be easy to get swept away, but don’t let regular sprayer maintenance slip.

Consider implementing these five tips for seasonal sprayer maintenance and let us know if you have additional tips to share by making a comment below, on Facebook or Twitter

Topics: Spray Equipment Maintenance, Winterizing Spray Equipment, lawn sprayer, diaphragm pump, spray equipment checklist, sprayer performance, sprayer strainer, Pesticide Application, spray nozzle, valves, parts, sprayer tips and tricks

5 Tips for Seasonal Sprayer Maintenance

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Mon, Sep 22, 2014

As the season changes to autumn (officially on Sept. 22, 2014), the scenery for many of us quickly follows, adding to it shades of red, orange and yellow to the typically green landscape. The weather too will turn cooler (at least we’re hopeful in Florida) and of course the needs of our sprayer changes too. While we’re not quite to the point where we need to winterize our tools, care should be given to prep for that necessary activity and to ensure the changing weather elements don’t impact the end of your season. We’ve combed over our collection of trade tips to uncover the essential needs for this time of year.

SD_KSedited

Below are five tips for autumn sprayer maintenance from Sprayer Depot to keep you going through the end of the season. 

1. Flush your sprayer.

To get rid of all excess chemical and chemical residues, flush your sprayer at least twice with clean water. It would be awful to not flush your pump with a month left in the spray season and then rupture some diaphragms. That would result in late season repairs you might not have accounted for, let alone the hassle. When you’re finished, make sure there’s no debris left in the tank.

2. Clean strainers.

This is one of those tasks no one enjoys, but is so necessary. Partially clogged strainers can result in drops in pressure and even reduce the flow rate of your nozzle. Not to mention that a clogged or dirty strainer can be a source of contamination where you may least expect it. Since most sprayers have more than one strainer, take care to clean each.

3.  Check fuel levels.

Make sure the oil levels in your spray pump, gearbox and engine are at appropriate levels. If you do need to refill oil, check with the part manufacturer to ensure you’re using the recommended oil.

4.  Inspect machine.

What you’re looking for are a number of things, including: worn nozzles; damaged nozzle screens and strainers; cracks, leaks and overall performance in the pump; hose condition, especially cracks or brittleness; any possible leaky valves or areas where valve seals may have loosened; and finally your booms (if applicable) to make sure there aren’t any cracks that need to be fixed. While you’re at it, keep the equipment clean by wiping down motors, pumps and lines.

5. Get a winterization game plan.

As the weather changes, winter is fast approaching and it’s time to dig out your winter coat. This is also the time to think about scheduling your annual winterization maintenance and end of year sprayer tune-up. Remember that caring for your machine properly now will pay off next year when it’s time to break it back out and use it. Put it in your calendar today and check back for more tips on winterizing your sprayer as the date approaches.

 

With sprayer season coming to a close in most parts of the country, our friends in the lawn maintenance and pesticide industries are busy making one more pass at killing weeds before the season ends. With so many holidays approaching it can be easy to get swept away, but don’t let regular sprayer maintenance slip.

Consider implementing these five tips for seasonal sprayer maintenance and let us know if you have additional tips to share by making a comment below, on Facebook or Twitter

Topics: Spray Equipment Maintenance, Winterizing Spray Equipment, lawn sprayer, diaphragm pump, spray equipment checklist, sprayer performance, sprayer strainer, Pesticide Application, spray nozzle, valves, parts, sprayer tips and tricks

Strainers: A Sprayer Companion

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Fri, Jul 18, 2014

One piece of equipment that is often overlooked is the strainer. Here we will dive into the importance of the strainer, or, as it is sometimes referred more simply, filters or screens. No matter what you call it, strainers are very important to reduce clogging, excessive erosion of spray tips and consistent fluid circulation of your sprayer equipment. As the name alludes, this part strains or filters debris to ensure even uninterrupted flow. 

To better understand the variety of strainers used on sprayers, we’ll discuss the most popular types of sprayer strainers used and review what strainer numbers mean.

Types of Strainers

Y strainer for sprayer equipmentShaped like the letter Y, the Y strainer is used in various agriculture and industrial liquid flow applications where the amount of debris that will be filtered is small. Often lightweight and made of polypropylene materials, the Y strainer is corrosion-resistant. Its cylindrical shape is very strong and meant to accommodate high pressures. These parts do have pressure ratings so make sure you choose the one that’s suitable for your sprayer system.

The T strainer is also shaped like its namesake, the letter T, but this part has a larger holding capacity so depending on its application it will go longer between cleanings. With the T strainer there is the option of purchasing the part with a clear T strainer with clear bowl for sprayer equipmentor white bowl, where the clear bowl offers the advantage of easy visibility to check for debris or chemical build-up. T strainers are good at trapping large particles and offer dozens of configurations, including self-cleaning strainers, designed for simple and quick cleaning and maintenance.

Built-in strainers, or tip strainers, prevent debris from entering the orifice or vane and can be used with a variety of standard and quick-connect flat spray, full cone, hollow cone and fine spray nozzles. These are used in conjunction with another type of strainer and filter out finer particles as a sort of last stop.

In general, most sprayer operations can benefit from adding line strainers or integral nozzle strainers. Though if you’re relying on tip strainers alone and these parts begin to plug frequently it may be necessary to add a single line strainer between the pump and the nozzle. From our experience, it’s much easier to clean a single strainer on the main line coming from the pump than to clean all of the individual tip strainers.

The Numbers

Strainer numbers represent the number of openings per square inch. The size can range from 10-200 mesh where high mesh numbers have smaller openings and result in a finer screen than low mesh numbers. So a 50 mesh means the strainer has 50 openings per inch. In general 100 mesh tip strainers are required for individual tips with a flow rate below 0.2 gallon per minute (gpm), 50 mesh between 0.2 and 1 gpm, and no strainer over 1 gpm. There are various strainer to sprayer tip combinations to provide the optimal psi, but for the sake of time we’ll save the topic of pressurization for later.

In considering the right size for your needs, keep in mind that the main strainer, often called inline or suction strainer, should be the same size or larger than the last strainer on the sprayer pump or boom. Though you don’t need to run strainers on each nozzle as long as you strain the water either into or directly out of all nurse tanks, have a main product strainer on the sprayer, and one strainer for each boom section of the sprayer. When in doubt, call the experts.

That’s not all. You also need to consider the type of product you’re spraying because fertilizers need a larger strainer than water based chemicals.

All in all, the strainer in your sprayer is one of the most important parts, but also one of the easiest to maintain. A clean and properly sealed strainer will allow proper flow to the pump and contribute to a longer pump life. If you’re looking for more on sprayer strainer maintenance, find out the 3 Reasons Why You Should Check Your Strainer in this post.

Topics: spray equipment, Sprayer Depot, Strainers, Sprayer Parts, sprayers, sprayer, strainer, sprayer strainer, spray tips, sprayer last longer, Sprayer Parts Guide, sprayer fitting, sprayer equipment, sprayer nozzle, T strainer, y strainer, line strainer, tip strainer, filter, screen, parts

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