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Sprayer Depot Blog

3 Sprayer Parts You Should Always Keep On Hand

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Fri, Mar 18, 2016

Proper Sprayer Maintenance Requires Keeping the Right Sprayer Parts in Sprayer-parts-replacement.jpgInventory

"How many spare parts should I keep on hand?" This question seems to come up often. While some customers like to stay prepared by keeping extra pumps, engines and other major sprayer components on hand, most keep a few key sprayer parts on the their shelves in order to do quick repairs in the field. Here are the top 3 "must-have” parts that we recommend to keep on hand:

 

Spray Tips

The spray tip is a critical part of any sprayer. Spray tips perform three functions:
  • Regulate flow
  • Atomize the mixture into droplets
  • Disperse the spray in a desirable pattern
Selecting the appropriate spray tip will depend on a variety of factors such as application, spray solution and droplet size needed. For example, increasing the spray tip angle decreases droplet size. Since smaller droplets drift longer distances, it's important to pick the right spray tip for the job.
 
Agitator

An agitator in the tank is needed to mix the spray material uniformly and keep chemicals in suspension. If this breaks, you will most definitely want to replace it ASAP, so make sure to have a replacement part ready to ensure an effective application.

Strainer

As we've previously said, the strainer is a very important part of your sprayer. Clogging can damage your entire unit if not replaced in a timely manner. You need to consider your spray solution when choosing the correct strainer for your sprayer. 

Strainer numbers (e.g. 20-mesh, 50-mesh, or 100-mesh) indicate the number of openings per inch. Strainers with high numbers have smaller openings than strainers with low numbers. A good tip to remember is: The higher the number the tighter the mesh.

Coarse basket strainers (also commonly referred to as basket filters) set in the tank-filler opening prevent debris from entering the tank as it is being filled. A 16- or 20-mesh tank basket filter will also restrain lumps of wettable powder until they are broken up, helping to give uniform mixing in the tank.

The line strainer is the most critical strainer of the sprayer. It usually has a screen size of 16 to 80 mesh, and it can be positioned between the tank and the pump, between the pump and the pressure regulator, or close to the boom, depending upon the type of pump you are using.

Roller and other positive displacement pumps should have a line strainer (40- or 50-mesh) located ahead of the pump to remove material that would damage the pump. In contrast, the inlet of a centrifugal pump must not be restricted. A line strainer (usually 50-mesh) should be located on the pressure side of the pump to protect the spray and agitation nozzles. Be sure to clean this screen regularly.

Spray season will soon be in full swing, so don't get caught unprepared! Shop for your replacement parts and keep your spray equipment running smoothly. 

Click HERE to Order Spray Tips, Strainers, Agitators and More!
Share in the comments below which parts you keep in your truck for repairs. Looking for even more information on building your own "emergency kit"? Read our previous post for ideas!

Topics: Sprayer Parts, sprayer nozzle, agitator, tank basket filter

3 Keys to Selecting the Right Spray Tip

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Thu, May 28, 2015

hypro_spraytipSpray tips are important, but these small components happen to be an often-overlooked part of a sprayer. With so many options on the market it’s no wonder that you might feel overwhelmed with choices. However, the benefits of finding the right tip for your application will pay in spades in the long run. Determining which spray nozzle is best for your needs depends on a variety of factors, including the type of spray application and your sprayer equipment.

An appropriate spray tip can do the following:

  •       Reduces off target spray
  •       Provides more control to improve coverage
  •       Means you save money
  •       Best for the environment
  •       Means you complete your spray job faster

So there’s a reason why there are so many different types of spray tips in tons of sizes, capacities and materials. To get started, you should identify your needs. This first step will guide you to a narrower field of nozzle options. For instance, are you trying to reduce spray drift? Do you need a wide pressure range? What would you change about the nozzle you’ve used most recently? Do you want better coverage? Once you’ve identified your needs, then follow these three keys to selecting the right spray tip.

1. Determine Flow Rate (gpm): You’ll need to identify the application volume (gpa), travel speed (mph) and nozzle spacing in inches (w) to find the right flow rate. Your calculation may look something like this: 

Flow Rate (gpm) = Volume x Speed x Nozzle Spacing
                                                   5,940 

Check out the Hypro SprayIT Calculator – it’s a helpful reference guide, or TeeJet’s nozzle selection guide

2. Select the Right Nozzle: With that information on hand you’ll have a better idea of the type of nozzle needed and can follow the manufacturer’s chart to identify the model that will work best for your needs.

Keep in mind that nozzles come in different materials. Brass resists corrosion from corrosive chemicals, plastic will not corrode and resist abrasion, stainless steel offer good corrosion resistance and are best suited for high pressures, aluminum are easily corroded by some fertilizers, and ceramic are highly resistant to abrasion and corrosion.

3. Calibrate and Adjust: After you’ve installed the new spray tip, calibrate your sprayer. This determines the amount of spray volume applied per acre. Also keep in mind that when you’re on a job, the spray pressure output of you sprayer may differ from the charts. You can adjust for this by determining the amount of pressure at the nozzle and then subtracting or adding pressure from your main gauge to compensate and ensure that you’re getting the desired output needed.

Have other suggestions to selecting the right spray tip for your needs? Maybe you’re a fan of simply calling our Customer Service Technicians to determine the right product or perhaps you have a specific brand you prefer. Either way, we’d love to hear what work best for you. Leave a comment below.

tipnozzle

Topics: spray tips, Spray Nozzles, spray tip, spray tip selection, sprayer nozzle, spray tip calculator, spray tip selector, drift control spray tip, Sprayer Nozzles, spray nozzle, spray tip guide, nozzle selection guide, spray nozzle selection

Hypro’s Spray Nozzle Selection Simplified

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Oct 15, 2014

We’re always looking for ways to make spray nozzle selection easier and we’ve shared some tips of the trade in past posts right here on our blog. With new advances in technology and an ever-evolving line-up of options, we couldn’t resist sharing this Spray Nozzle Selection Guide and helpful information from our friends at Hypro.

Consider this. When selecting nozzles it’s easy to determine what droplet and flow rate you need, but what happens when the chemical you are spraying changes? Does that change the nozzle you should be using?

Hypro has developed a simple set of tools that will help steer you to the correct nozzle technology while considering multiple tank mix characteristics. The Spray Nozzle Selection Guide will walk you through a series of questions to identify the correct nozzle, including:

  • What and when are you spraying?
  • Are you using an adjuvant, and if so, what type?
  • In your chemical Contact or Systemic?
  • Is your primary concern drift or coverage?
Hypro's Spray Nozzle Guide

Nozzle Selection Guide

From there you’ll determine which of six nozzles are best for your application. Choices include Hi-Flow and ESI Six Stream, which are best for Fertilizer Plant Nutrients. Those spraying Herbicides and doing Weed Control would be served best with the Ultra Lo-Drift, Guardian or GuardianAir nozzle types, according to the guide. Rounding out the bunch are the Insecticide/Fungicide Plant Health needs that are best suited by using the Guardian, GuardianAir or GuardianAir Twin nozzles.

Interested in more? Hypro’s Spray Tip Guide digs further into the subject, providing technical details to support your selection. Some of the topics covered include:

  • Why different nozzles should be used when changing what you spray
  • How do adjuvants effect nozzle selection
  • When does using a Contact or Systemic chemical change your nozzle selection
If you still have questions regarding what spray nozzle you should use, contact one of Sprayer Depot's knowledgeable Customer Service Technicians.

Topics: Hypro, herbicides, Sprayer Depot, Sprayer Parts, pest control, spray tips, Spray Nozzles, pesticides, Pesticide Application, Pesticide applicator, spray tip, spray tip selection, Sprayer Parts Guide, spray smarter, sprayer nozzle, tip selector, tip selection, spray tip selector, fungicides, Sprayer Nozzles, spray nozzle, weed control, fertilizer, insecticide, plant health, spray tip guide, nozzle selection guide, spray nozzle selection

How To Manage Spray Drift in 5 Easy Steps

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Aug 27, 2014

Kings SprayerImagine you’re applying pesticides using a backpack sprayer. Or, just the same, you’re spraying from a truck using a tank, pump and hose to apply chemicals. Maybe you’re using a boom setup. For that matter, you could even be piloting an airplane and in each situation the definition of spray drift is the same.

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency: “pesticide drift is the movement of pesticide dust or droplets through the air at the time of application or soon after, to any site other than the area intended.”

We’re all aware of those two dreaded words: Spray Drift. While the repercussions of it vary for each industry and application type, the definition and solutions to manage spray drift are similar. In many of these scenarios above the issue with spray drift can lead to spotty pest control, wasted chemicals, off-target damage, water and air quality issues and higher costs. That last one really hurts. As the public becomes more aware of pesticide concerns, and regulators are quick to slap fines, spray drift management from that standpoint is vital to our livelihood.

Much like you take precautions to protect yourself with your work attire by making sure to wear proper clothing, eye protection and closed-toe shoes, you should also consider these five steps to manage spray drift from Sprayer Depot.

  1. Avoid spraying when weather conditions are unfavorable. I know, I know. You’ve heard this time and time again that weather affects spray drift. It’s true though and often times we get so caught up in our day-to-day that we ignore this important factor. Think about the day’s conditions as it relates to wind, temperature and humidity, air stability, etc. Know your product labels well and understand these requirements, even for wind velocity. Make adjustments accordingly. It may, even on the extreme end, require you to reschedule that day’s work. Also think about how droplet size factors into the weather issue. Large droplets are less likely to drift in general because they fall more quickly, evaporate more slowly and are less affected by the wind given their size. We like that.
  2. Consider using buffer zones. This aspect is becoming more important given label requirements these days. These "no spray zones" serve as a barrier to protect sensitive areas and vary greatly for each landscape, equipment and application type. Design of a buffer area depends on variables like spray method, wind, chemical type and the type of sensitive area that you’re trying to avoid. In general there is not a one-size-fits-all rule.
  3. Try new technologies like drift reduction nozzles. We recently spoke to Mark Techler with Hypro & SHURflo Ag and Industrial Pumps and Accessories in a recent blog post about drift control spray tips. He explained that these drift control spray tips “use air induction to produce air filled droplets, which dramatically reduce drift compared to conventional tips.” He went on to share the benefits of this new tech and offered up the Hypro SprayIT Calculator as a resource the next time your considering one of these new parts.
  4. Lower spray (boom) heights. It makes sense. The higher the boom, and thus the spray nozzle, are above the target, the more likely that wind will move droplets away from the intended area. Your nozzle label will offer a recommendation on nozzle height, which can serve as a good starting point to adjust the boom height. However, often those recommendations for nozzle height are much higher than optimum on large application equipment traveling at higher speeds. Of course, you want to ensure the boom isn’t too low, which can create uneven patterns. A 1:1 boom height has generally been the standard, but some recommend getting a tad closer so we recommend using the manufacturer recommendation as a starting point and working down from there – take into account your unique landscape and spray mechanics. 
  5. Use lower pressures.  In general, the concept that we’ve all heard is to use lower pressures, which result in larger droplets. However, in today’s application world this method might need some adjusting given the new technologies with drift control spray nozzles. With the design of some drift control spray nozzles that introduce air induction, these tips will create a drop in pressure while still producing larger droplets. 

Your actions can affect spray drift. After all, you CAN control the equipment you use and the field conditions you spray. So while you may not have control over the weather or even the neighboring property, you can be empowered by these 5 easy steps to manage spray drift and you have the opportunity to educate your team, too.

Topics: Spray Equipment Maintenance, Hypro, Boom Sprayer, fertilizer sprayer, Sprayer Depot, sprayers, spray equipment checklist, sprayer, spray tips, calibrating a sprayer, spray tip, spray tip selection, Shurflo, Sprayer Calibration, sprayer checklist, sprayer equipment, sprayer nozzle, spray drift, spray tip calculator, spray tip selector, drift control spray tip, drift control, Sprayer Set Up, Calibrating a Boom Sprayer, Boom Sprayer Calibration, sprayer tips and tricks

5 Things You Already Know To Avoid When Setting Up Your Sprayer

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Tue, Aug 05, 2014

You own a sprayer. It’s pretty important to your profession. You work in the lawn/landscape,Kings Sprayers pest control, agricultural, golf/recreation, or horticultural industries. You know how to spray. You’re smart. You understand what components are needed to get the optimal pressure from your equipment or how that simple little o-ring can make or break your day. Does that description sound familiar? Any pro who has been spraying for five to 30 years and more will understand that as technology in this field advances, so do your own tips and tricks of the trade.

Here we’ll share five tried and true things you should avoid when setting up your sprayer for the day, for the season or even for the first time. We’re talking routine tips you likely do every day that you use your sprayer, as well as a few deal breakers we’d be remiss if we didn’t share. So consider this more of a checklist, than an instruction manual as you beat the heat today.  

1.) Know your nozzle. From using the right tip for your application needs, to understanding how to clean it properly, knowing your nozzle is key. By now you know which tip offers the optimal performance, which spray pattern works best for your needs, and how to check flow rates. But as new technology comes to market and we’re better able to control drift or other outside forces, don’t forget the simple information from this buying guide for spray tips that can make all the difference for your season.

2.) Clean your equipment. Yes, this is a given, but a factor that often gets overlooked when you’re tired from a long day or running behind to get home for dinner. However, cleaning your sprayer after each use can take mere minutes compared to the hours you’ll spend cleaning build-up the next day – or worse if the next time you use it is weeks or months away. Once you’ve cleaned your sprayer, take a few extra minutes to calibrate your sprayer for optimal spraying and you’ll be happier the next time you’re ready to use it.

3.) Check your tire pressure. If you’re sporting a two- or four-wheel sprayer or even one that’s mounted to the bed of your truck, operating with the correct tire pressure is important for a smooth ride and sprayer stability. Be sure to check the tire pressure of your rig against the manufacturer’s recommendation. After all, tires act as both a spring and shock absorber so running with tire pressure too high can reduce traction and amplify any surface irregularities. That’s the last thing you want to deal with when you start spraying. To that end, if you’re using a smaller handheld or backpack sprayer the same tools apply – check the shoulder straps for a secure fit and wear the right shoes for that added spring in your step.

4.) Watch the weather.Whether you’re concern is 100 degree heat or that thunderstorm brewing just west of your location, watching the weather will make all the difference as you plan for your day. For more on watering tips and the weather, check out our recent post on water use and 5 tips for smart spraying. We know with the drought watches and warnings our friends in California are all over this one! 

5.) Don’t settle for mediocre. Have pride in the equipment you own and if something’s not working properly or not the best fit for your needs, don’t settle. Doing so could not only negatively impact your work, but also could lead to added frustration or longer work hours. Cut yourself some slack and don’t settle for anything less than the best. Spraying shouldn’t be a chore, have some fun with it and that means not settling for anything less than what’s best for your usage.

So there you have it. Now it’s your turn to share. What are your tried and true tips and tricks of the spraying trade? Share them in the comments below, on Facebook or Twitter.

 

Click HERE to Download

Topics: Kings Sprayer, Kings Sprayers, sprayer nozzle, Sprayer Set Up, Sprayer Nozzles

Strainers: A Sprayer Companion

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Fri, Jul 18, 2014

One piece of equipment that is often overlooked is the strainer. Here we will dive into the importance of the strainer, or, as it is sometimes referred more simply, filters or screens. No matter what you call it, strainers are very important to reduce clogging, excessive erosion of spray tips and consistent fluid circulation of your sprayer equipment. As the name alludes, this part strains or filters debris to ensure even uninterrupted flow. 

To better understand the variety of strainers used on sprayers, we’ll discuss the most popular types of sprayer strainers used and review what strainer numbers mean.

Types of Strainers

Y strainer for sprayer equipmentShaped like the letter Y, the Y strainer is used in various agriculture and industrial liquid flow applications where the amount of debris that will be filtered is small. Often lightweight and made of polypropylene materials, the Y strainer is corrosion-resistant. Its cylindrical shape is very strong and meant to accommodate high pressures. These parts do have pressure ratings so make sure you choose the one that’s suitable for your sprayer system.

The T strainer is also shaped like its namesake, the letter T, but this part has a larger holding capacity so depending on its application it will go longer between cleanings. With the T strainer there is the option of purchasing the part with a clear T strainer with clear bowl for sprayer equipmentor white bowl, where the clear bowl offers the advantage of easy visibility to check for debris or chemical build-up. T strainers are good at trapping large particles and offer dozens of configurations, including self-cleaning strainers, designed for simple and quick cleaning and maintenance.

Built-in strainers, or tip strainers, prevent debris from entering the orifice or vane and can be used with a variety of standard and quick-connect flat spray, full cone, hollow cone and fine spray nozzles. These are used in conjunction with another type of strainer and filter out finer particles as a sort of last stop.

In general, most sprayer operations can benefit from adding line strainers or integral nozzle strainers. Though if you’re relying on tip strainers alone and these parts begin to plug frequently it may be necessary to add a single line strainer between the pump and the nozzle. From our experience, it’s much easier to clean a single strainer on the main line coming from the pump than to clean all of the individual tip strainers.

The Numbers

Strainer numbers represent the number of openings per square inch. The size can range from 10-200 mesh where high mesh numbers have smaller openings and result in a finer screen than low mesh numbers. So a 50 mesh means the strainer has 50 openings per inch. In general 100 mesh tip strainers are required for individual tips with a flow rate below 0.2 gallon per minute (gpm), 50 mesh between 0.2 and 1 gpm, and no strainer over 1 gpm. There are various strainer to sprayer tip combinations to provide the optimal psi, but for the sake of time we’ll save the topic of pressurization for later.

In considering the right size for your needs, keep in mind that the main strainer, often called inline or suction strainer, should be the same size or larger than the last strainer on the sprayer pump or boom. Though you don’t need to run strainers on each nozzle as long as you strain the water either into or directly out of all nurse tanks, have a main product strainer on the sprayer, and one strainer for each boom section of the sprayer. When in doubt, call the experts.

That’s not all. You also need to consider the type of product you’re spraying because fertilizers need a larger strainer than water based chemicals.

All in all, the strainer in your sprayer is one of the most important parts, but also one of the easiest to maintain. A clean and properly sealed strainer will allow proper flow to the pump and contribute to a longer pump life. If you’re looking for more on sprayer strainer maintenance, find out the 3 Reasons Why You Should Check Your Strainer in this post.

Topics: spray equipment, Sprayer Depot, Strainers, Sprayer Parts, sprayers, sprayer, strainer, sprayer strainer, spray tips, sprayer last longer, Sprayer Parts Guide, sprayer fitting, sprayer equipment, sprayer nozzle, T strainer, y strainer, line strainer, tip strainer, filter, screen, parts

6 Reasons Why You Need Drift Control Spray Tips

Posted by Sprayer Depot on Wed, Jul 16, 2014

Contributed by Guest Blogger: Mark Techler, Factory Representative - Hypro & SHURflo Ag and Industrial Pumps and Accessories
Hypro air inducing spray tip


Spray tips
are the smallest and most overlooked components of a sprayer. Drift control spray tips use air induction to produce air filled droplets, which dramatically reduce drift compared to conventional tips. Here are the benefits: 

  1. Reduce off target spray. Your neighbors don’t want your ag chemicals on their property.
  2. Improve efficacy. It is estimated that 30% of conventionally sprayed droplets drift off target, land on the ground, or evaporate (leaving the active ingredient inert). Reduce that drift to 2% and achieve better results.
  3. Improve coverage. Air filled droplets stick to their target while conventional droplets may bounce off. When the air bubbles break the surface tension of the droplet, the spray material becomes more dispersed on the target.  
  4. Improve spray quality. The chemical label shows a droplet size category, which can vary from extremely fine to ultra coarse, at which the product must be applied for optimum results. Air induction tips produce more consistent droplet diameters than conventional tips.
  5. Save money. With improved efficacy and coverage you may require less chemical and less water to finish the job. With improved efficacy and coverage likely you will only need to spray once, saving money and time.
  6. Be environmentally responsible. Keep herbicides, pesticides, fungicides, and fertilizers confined to their targets and out of drinking water supplies and the aquifer.

Before you buy any spray tips, it is also important to know:

  1. Your spray technique: broadcast or banding
  2. Sprayer speed (in mph)
  3. Tip spacing (20 inches, etc.)
  4. Application rate (from chemical label)
  5. Spray tip flow rate (GPA or GPM)
  6. Spray pattern: flat fan or cone
  7. Spray quality (fine, medium, coarse, etc. from chemical label)

Armed with this information, use the Hypro SprayIT Calculator to select drift reduction tips. Hypro has designed this online calculator to make it easy to select the proper spray tip for your application. Given the information we just covered, all you need to do is select the type of application and input your specific application data and the calculator with do the rest.

Topics: Sprayer Depot, Sprayer Parts, spray equipment checklist, sprayer, spray tips, spray tip, spray tip selection, Sprayer Parts Guide, sprayer checklist, sprayer nozzle, spray drift, spray tip calculator, tip selector, tip selection, spray tip selector, drift control spray tip, drift control

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